Johnson & Johnson launches Heartline, virtual study to explore if an iPhone app and Apple Watch can reduce risk of stroke

Johnson & Johnson launches Heartline, virtual study to explore if an iPhone app and Apple Watch can reduce risk of stroke

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | February 26, 2020 Cardiology Stroke
New Brunswick, NJ, February 25, 2020 — Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced that the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, in collaboration with Apple, opened enrollment for the Heartline Study. The study is designed to explore if the Heartline Study app on iPhone and heart health features on Apple Watch can improve health outcomes, including reducing the risk of stroke, with earlier detection of atrial fibrillation (AFib). AFib, a common form of irregular heart rhythm, is a leading cause of stroke in the U.S. To enroll in the Heartline Study, individuals must be age 65 or older, a U.S. resident, have Original (traditional) Medicare, own an iPhone 6s or a later model, and agree to provide access to their Medicare claims data.

“Heartline is a study that has the potential to fundamentally change our understanding of how digital health tools, like the ECG app and irregular rhythm notification feature on Apple Watch, could lead to earlier detection of AFib, helping patients understand and directly engage in their heart health, prompting potentially life-saving conversations with their doctors, and improving health outcomes,” notes Dr. C. Michael Gibson*, Co-Chair of the Heartline Executive Committee and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and CEO, Baim Institute.

“The Heartline™ Study from Johnson & Johnson, in collaboration with Apple, has the potential to fundamentally change our understanding of how technology can help improve health outcomes,ˮ says Heartline Executive Committee Co-Chair @CMichaelGibson

Servicing GE/Siemens Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

Numed, a well established company in business since 1975 provides a wide range of service options including time & material service, PM only contracts, full service contracts, labor only contracts & system relocation. Call 800 96 Numed for more info.

Despite the fact that AFib is a leading cause of stroke, people often do not experience symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose. More than 33 million people worldwide and up to six million Americans live with AFib.1,2 Up to 30% don’t even know they have it until a serious cardiovascular event, such as a stroke, occurs.3 According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, AFib, the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, results in 158,000 deaths and 454,000 hospitalizations each year.2

“As we look to tackle some of the greatest health care challenges, we must bring the best minds and capabilities to the table,” said Paul Burton, M.D., Ph.D., FACC, Vice President, Medical Affairs, Internal Medicine, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, a Janssen Pharmaceutical Company of Johnson & Johnson. “Through this important collaboration with Apple, we are pioneering new models that we hope can break down some of the most common barriers to participation in clinical studies. Our work continues to develop and deliver solutions for those impacted by AFib in the areas of detection, treatment and care, through novel approaches, so that we can potentially improve their lives today and well into the future.”

Back to HCB News

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment