DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Aktueller Standort:
>
> This Story


Log in oder Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

More Industry Headlines

Enhanced automation provides lifeline to managing data deluge in oncology Harnessing data for more efficient radiation treatment

GE launches Invenia ABUS 2.0 in US Fifty five percent more efficient in detecting breast cancer than mammography alone

More than 20 percent of insured mammo screenings require some out-of-pocket payment Could prevent screening for lower-income women

How remote / mobile reading will be part of the future in radiology Sometimes 'phoning it in' is actually a good thing

Deep Lens raises $3.2 million for AI-based cloud platform Aim to make it accessible worldwide and free of charge

New AI approach identifies recalled but benign mammograms May reduce workload by providing more accurate recall selection

Varian acquires Noona Healthcare Gains mobile service app that captures PROs

Spectral CT, workflow and dose reduction drive new CT scanner and software releases

Maryland Proton Treatment Center combines hyperthermia with proton therapy May yield added benefits for treatment outcomes

Virginia med school to offer portable ultrasound with 12-lead ECG technology Viewing the heart and measuring electrical activity

From the cockpit to the OR: safety and simulation in surgery

By Dr. Justin Barad

The aviation industry and healthcare industry have been compared for a long time, most often on the topic of safety. Both fields carry an immense responsibility to protect the public and eliminate human error as much as possible. Numerous studies and reports showcase how much traction the aviation industry has made compared to healthcare in lowering the number of fatalities, in light of increased risk as the aviation industry has grown. A 2016 study from researchers in the U.K., notes that though the number of worldwide flight hours has doubled over the past 20 years, airline fatalities have fallen nearly 45 percent. However, in the U.S. alone, 200,000 preventable medical deaths happen every year – the equivalent of three fatal airline crashes per day.
Story Continues Below Advertisement

Dunlee announces the relaunch of DA135 CT/e, DA165NP and Akron tubes

Dunlee announces the return of the DA135 CT/e, DA165NP, S532B and S532Q(known as the Akron tubes) CT Replacement tubes, making its full portfolio of CT tubes for GE and Siemens CT scanners available once again.Click to learn more


The similarities and differences in the two industries is a hot debate. The comparison of training and assessment required for pilots and surgeons is an important area to consider when human factors greatly impact safety in both industries. It is also interesting to look at the rate of new knowledge entering each industry compared to the requirements for assessment and reassessment of that knowledge throughout a pilot or surgeon’s career.

Initial pilot training normally takes around 250 hours of flight time. Every six months, pilots must go into a simulator where they practice and are assessed on standard and emergency procedures. While surgeons undergo a significantly longer initial training period in medical school and residency, there is no assessment (or reassessment) requirement for surgeons. Our current approach to surgical training is time-based, not competency-based; a fact that greatly sets healthcare apart from aviation in its approach to training.

Why is this important? Healthcare knowledge is becoming increasingly difficult for practitioners to keep up with. New studies show that, by 2020, medical knowledge will double every 73 days compared to doubling every 50 years in the 1950s. The innovation and complexity of medical device technology is particularly challenging for surgeons. Increasingly complex technology means an increasing number of cases need to be practiced, but learning it is not as simple. Numbers vary between studies, but in general, a surgeon used to need to perform at least 25 cases to obtain a basic level of safety. Now, the number is around 75-80 (and in some cases more than 100) to achieve optimal proficiency. On the other hand, the cockpit has been simplified for pilots with the advent and adoption of new technology, yet their time spent in simulators nativigating emergency scenarios and ensuring preparedness for those events is greater than surgeons.
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Related:


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Werben
Erhöhen Sie Ihren Bekanntheitsgrad
Auktionen + Privatverkäufe
Den besten Preis erzielen
Geräte/Geräteteile kaufen
Den günstigsten Preis finden
Daily News
Die neuesten Nachrichten lesen
Übersicht
Alle DOTmed Benutzer durchsuchen
Ethik auf DOTmed
Unseren Ethik-Standard anzeigen
Gold-Parts Verkäufer-Programm
PH-Anfragen erhalten
Gold Service Dealer-Programm
Anfragen empfangen
Gesundheitsdienstleister
Alle Gesundheitsdienstleister-Tools anzeigen
Jobs/Training
Einen Job suchen
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Angebote für Geräteteile erhalten
Kürzlich zertifiziert
Kürzlich zertifizierte Benutzer anzeigen
Kürzlich bewertet
Kürzlich zertifizierte Benutzer anzeigen
Rental Central
Geräte billiger mieten
Geräte/Geräteteile verkaufen
Das meiste Geld erhalten
Service-Techniker Forum
Hilfe und Beratung finden
Einfache Angebots-Anfrage
Angebote für Geräte erhalten
Virtuelle Messe
Service für Geräte finden
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED