DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Aktueller Standort:
>
> This Story


Log in oder Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

MRI Homepage

New VR app may ease MR anxiety Hope to cut down on the need to sedate patients

NYU releases biggest ever MR data set in AI Facebook collaboration With fastMRI, acceleration of imaging by factor of four 'already possible'

Elekta Unity MR-linac gains FDA 510(k) clearance Simultaneously delivers radiation dose and visualization of tumors

The imaging implant conundrum: scanning safely and efficiently The number of people with implanted medical devices is skyrocketing

Making the 'virtual biopsy' a reality with MR spectroscopy New techniques have big potential for MR imaging

Metrasens promotes MR safety data management solution and implant detection study Beyond ferromagnetic detectors

Canon debuts AI for image reconstruction and 1.5T MR at RSNA Advanced Intelligent Clear-IQ Engine and Vantage Orian

Philips debuts versions of its Ingenia Ambition 1.5T MR System Equipped with BlueSeal magnet, can perform helium-free operations

Implants, gadolinium and AI: Changing perceptions in MR From hard questions over contrast retention to softening views on implants

Siemens debuts 1.5T MR and floor-mounted rad system at RSNA Bringing premium technology to the price-conscious market

A new MR detector shows
movement of tendons and ligaments
clearly for the first time

New MR 'glove' brings hand joint movement into focus

by John R. Fischer , Staff Reporter
Need a hand?

Researchers at NYU Langone School of Medicine have developed a new, wearable MR component to help patients with hand-related injuries return to these and other activities more quickly by producing, for the first time, clear images of joint movement for enhanced diagnosis.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Questions to ask and things to consider about MRI coil repair processes

What to Expect from MRI Coil Repairs that Meet Clinical Expectations and Drive ROI. Click for A Guideline of Standards to Expect and Demand for Sustainable MRI Coil Repairs



“CT is really good at visualizing the bones, but it is difficult to see any of the other structures. Video fluoroscopy, generally only provides a 2D projection with very poor soft tissue contrast,” Martijn A Cloos, an assistant professor in the department of radiology at NYU Langone, told HCB News. “MR, on the other hand, provides exquisite soft tissue contrast that can be used to visualize muscle structures, cartilage and nerves.”

But imaging complex, moving joints, such as tendons and ligaments, has been challenging for MR due to its conversion of radio waves by radiofrequency coils into a detectable electric current, with the radio waves producing minute currents, as a result, in the receiver coils. This, in turn, causes the receiver coils to create their own magnetic fields that prevent nearby coils from capturing clean signals to produce such images.

The MR element overrides this limitation using high-impedance coils stitched into a cotton glove.

Unlike conventional coils, designed as low-impedance structures, the new coils block the MR signal from developing a current, thereby preventing the creation of magnetic fields and the interference they cause for neighboring receivers.

The technology consists of high-impedance coils stitched into a cotton glove

Researchers used the system to examine a hand playing the piano and grabbing objects, finding that it produced clear images of freely moving muscles as well as tendons and ligaments, both of which have historically been difficult to image independently due to their dense protein compositions, appearing as black bands running alongside the bone.

When assessing the hand as it flexed its fingers, the system showed movement of the bands in relation to that of the bones, a finding that researchers claim could help in cataloguing differences in injuries.

The authors hope that the technology will help to construct a more versatile atlas of hand anatomy, produce images of hands in more realistic positions for better surgical guidance, and enhance prosthetic design.

They also suggest that the flexibility of the coils and their immunity to coupling effects make them suitable as comfortable and adaptive MR coils in other applications.

“One particular example application would be a ‘beanie-like' head coil for pediatric patients. We imagine that such a coil may be more comfortable and less intimidating,” Cloos said. “Moreover, such a coil could adapt to the shape and size of the individuals head, thus providing optimal coverage and image quality.”

The findings are compiled in a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

MRI Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Werben
Erhöhen Sie Ihren Bekanntheitsgrad
Auktionen + Privatverkäufe
Den besten Preis erzielen
Geräte/Geräteteile kaufen
Den günstigsten Preis finden
Daily News
Die neuesten Nachrichten lesen
Übersicht
Alle DOTmed Benutzer durchsuchen
Ethik auf DOTmed
Unseren Ethik-Standard anzeigen
Gold-Parts Verkäufer-Programm
PH-Anfragen erhalten
Gold Service Dealer-Programm
Anfragen empfangen
Gesundheitsdienstleister
Alle Gesundheitsdienstleister-Tools anzeigen
Jobs/Training
Einen Job suchen
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Angebote für Geräteteile erhalten
Kürzlich zertifiziert
Kürzlich zertifizierte Benutzer anzeigen
Kürzlich bewertet
Kürzlich zertifizierte Benutzer anzeigen
Rental Central
Geräte billiger mieten
Geräte/Geräteteile verkaufen
Das meiste Geld erhalten
Service-Techniker Forum
Hilfe und Beratung finden
Einfache Angebots-Anfrage
Angebote für Geräte erhalten
Virtuelle Messe
Service für Geräte finden
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED