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Keep mobile C-arms on the move

by Nancy Ryerson, Staff Writer | April 01, 2013
From the April 2013 issue of HealthCare Business News magazine

Mobile C-arms are sturdy, with a lifespan of 10 to even 20 years, but these reliable pieces of equipment can still develop problems, especially if they’re heavily used and carted to different rooms on a daily basis. Stephen Walsh, president of Eastern Diagnostic Imaging, Inc; Ed Ruth, account manager at Managed Medical Imaging, LLC; Chad Hanoman, service manager at Managed Medical Imaging, Inc.; and Leon Gugel, president of Metropolis International, LLC, shared a few tips on treating the hard-working machines with care.

  • Don’t leave your mobile C-arm unplugged.
    Mobile C-arm battery life can be considerably shortened if machines aren’t left plugged in when not in use. Battery depletion can lead to a battery of problems, including memory loss on the machine, which then requires a reload. Be sure to plug it in from time to time to charge up the battery for later use.


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  • Move your mobile C-arm the right way.
    Mobile C-arms are built to move, but they still should be transported with care. The handles are there to help move the machine. Some people will grab a cable to drag it along and that can be a costly lapse in judgement. Users should also be careful to clear a path for the C-arm to move through.


  • “Plug and play,” but with caution.
    Mobile C-arms are a “plug and play” modality, but attention needs to be paid to how the equipment is plugged in to avoid problems. Arrange the wires in a place where they won’t be stepped on or rolled over, as cables can be expensive to replace, and be sure to have a surge protector between the wall and the unit. Also ensure that the pins that connect the workstation to the main body are inserted carefully, as the needle-like pins can become bent.


  • Just turn it off.
    Last but not least, here is one of the easiest fixes we have ever shared in our tips column: if you’re receiving an error, try turning off the machine then turning it back on. If you get an error code after reboot or any other sign of a problem, then it’s time to call in reinforcements.

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